WLR Featured Pics September 2016

WLR Featured Pics September 2016

In September we featured photos by

  • Annemarie du Plessis
  • John-Ray Brentnall
  • Anthony Goldman
  • Isak Pretorius

[Read]: Our current WLR Featured Pics

To submit your work for a feature on Where Lions Roam, just drop us an email at featuredpic@wherelionsroam.com with a resized photo (1000 pixels on the long edge). You remain the owner of the photo, we will link to your site and you can watermark your work.

September 2016, Week 1: Speak no Evil

Featured Pic Annemarie du Plessis Speak no Evil

Photo by: Annemarie du Plessis

Camera: CANON EOS 7D MK II Lens: CANON EF 7200-400 f/4 L EXT 1.4 IS USM

ISO: 6400
F/stop: f/5.6
Shutter: 1/500sec

Annemarie’s Description:

My vehicle was parked quite close to the baboons that were playing next to the road.  I was stabilizing my camera and gimble on a bean bag. It was fun watching the inter-action between mommy and baby baboon – especially when she covered his mouth with her hand. It looked like she was fed up with his screaming and tried to quiet him – exactly like a human mommy would do.

September 2016, Week 2: Fish Eagle vs Stork

Featured Pic Fish Eagle vs Stork 1

Featured Pic Fish Eagle vs Stork 2

Featured Pic Fish Eagle vs Stork 3

Featured Pic Fish Eagle vs Stork 4

Featured Pic Fish Eagle vs Stork 5

Photo by: John-Ray Brentnall

Camera: Canon 70d Lens: Canon 100-400mm

John-Ray’s Description:

The drought throughout Kruger has seriously impacted local dams. I just started guiding at Phelwana game lodge  who have 3 dams. One is empty, one is almost dry and the main one is just barely coping. Full of catfish, tilapia and carp the fish eagles and marabou storks are enjoying somewhat of a feast.

This morning on my way to the lodge I see the fish eagle swoop down and catch a tilapia and evidently straight into the path of a marabou stork. Wings out, talons at the ready the fish eagle vigorously defends it’s catch. Although many attempts by the marabou stork, the fish eagle wins and all the while they are both mobbed by the brave blacksmith lapwing.

September 2016, Week 3: Tsalala Lioness

Featured Pic Tsalala Lioness

Photo by: Anthony Goldman (Facebook page)

Camera: Canon 1 DX, Lens Canon 200-400mm at 560mm with 1.4 x extender

Iso: 2000
Shutter: 1/500s
F-Stop: F/6.3

Anthony’s Description:

The Tsalala pride had 2 lionesses with cubs and were hanging around Marthly pools on and off the rocks on the banks of the Manyalethi River, at Londolozi. The one set of cubs were only weeks old and were not being seen and the den was moved often in the same area but the other cubs were a few months old and were being seen frequently. On the early morning drive we headed down to the Manyalethi River in the early morning hoping to see these cubs active and playing. We were fortunate to find the 2 cubs with one lioness high up on the rocks but on arrival the cubs were asleep and lying down. We decided to wait a while and after an hours wait were rewarded by the cubs waking up and actively playing with each other and getting some love and grooming by mom in the early morning light which was the basis of the photo and quite a few others from this wonderful sighting at at Londolozi in the Sabi Sands.

September 2016, Week 4: Springbok

Featured PIC Isak Pretorius
Photo by: Isak Pretorius (Isak is also featured in our Best Photo Safaris to South Africa article)

Camera: Canon 5D Mark II, Lens Canon 600mm F4

Iso: 250
Shutter: 1/20s
F-Stop: F/36

Shutter priority, +1/3EV

Isak’s Description:

Species: Springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis), Location: Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa

The springbok is commonly known as one of the fastest antelope in Africa. It was a cloudy morning in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in South Africa when a pride of lions casually walked across a dry riverbed. I could see that they had recently eaten and were probably not interested in hunting for food at that stage. They did however spook a group of springbok that were grazing in that riverbed. The springbok did not take any chances and ran away to maintain a safe distance from the lions. I wanted to capture the running springbok with a sense of movement to accentuate this characteristic of the species.

Note – How to take a Motion Blur Photo

  1. Place your camera in Shutter Priority mode (Tv on a Canon)

Featured Pic Mode Dial 1

  1. Set shutter speed to a slower setting, to 1/10 for people walking, 1/20 for animals, 1/50 or 1/100 for cars. Shutter priority will lock the shutter speed at your selection and adjust aperture to ensure normal exposure.
  2. Track the walking, running, speeding subject to get a nice blur in the background.

Have a look at our: Feature Videos

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Izak Van Heerden
Izak is a writer, photographer and wildlife enthusiast. When he moves on from this world, he does not want to leave his grandchildren a planet without lions, rhinos and elephants.

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